Living a Lifestyle of Service: 14 Ways You Can Fight Hunger in 2014

Martin Luther King Jr.

Last Monday, Jan. 20, the nation observed Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. For some, it was a day off from work or school. But for others, it was a chance to give back to their communities, as part of the MLK Day of Service. Volunteer organizations, churches, universities and other groups gathered to work on projects both large and small. Some of THI’s AmeriCorps VISTAs participated in activities around the state, from pulling weeds and painting piers, to clearing lots and harvesting crops.

Since 1994, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day has been the only federal holiday observed as a national day of service, referred to as “a day on, not a day off.”

Dr. King believed in a country where everyone could experience freedom and justice, and he sought this goal through nonviolence. He once said, “Life’s most persistent and urgent question is: ‘What are you doing for others?’” In that spirit of service, MLK Day has become a way to honor his memory while also strengthening communities.

But what if we took it a step further? What if, rather than just participating in a day of service, we participated in a lifestyle of service?

What if “what are you doing for others?” became a question we asked ourselves each morning—something we strived to answer each day?

Often there’s something holding us back from incorporating service into our daily lives. We wonder how much we have to give—how much money we have to donate, or how much time we’ll need to volunteer. We wonder if our individual efforts will really make much of a difference. We think that the small acts of service won’t make a dent in the fight against huge issues like poverty and hunger.

But if we shifted our focus from ourselves to others, we would find that those small efforts could collectively lead to a significant impact.

14 Ways You Can Fight Hunger in 2014

Here are 14 doable ways you can get involved in the fight against hunger in 2014. Whether you have an afternoon, an hour, or just a few minutes, there’s something you can do to make a difference.

1.  Educate yourself on how hunger impacts the United States. There are many great resources out there to help you learn more.  See how hunger affects your area by using Feeding America’s Map the Meal Gap. Another interesting interactive map from the New York Times illustrates poverty numbers based on census data. Here are two books that do a good job illustrating hunger and poverty in the United States: “All You Can Eat: How Hungry is America?” by Joel Berg, and “The Working Poor: Invisible in America” by David K. Shipler. Prefer to watch a documentary? We recommend “A Place at the Table.”

2. Share what you’ve learned with your family,  coworkers and community. Use one of the books listed above, or another book focused on poverty and hunger, for your book club. Have friends over for a movie night and watch “A Place at the Table.” Collaborate with other organizations and groups to host a speaker to talk more about hunger in the community. Submit an appearance request form if you would like someone from our organization to speak at your event.

3. Join a hunger coalition in your area. These groups bring together people from all walks of life whom are committed to reducing hunger in their communities. They collaborate with local pantries and food banks, businesses, congregations, food producers, anti-hunger organizations and more to provide food security. Here are the links for some of these organizations in:  DallasLubbock, San Antonio, San Angelo, and Waco.

4.  Host a food drive for your local food bank or food pantry. Before you begin, be sure to contact your local food bank or pantry to see what is needed most. And while donations are important, funds go a long way as well. They can be used to purchase fresh produce, milk, eggs, and other perishable items. You can also start a food drive virtually, through this tool from Feeding America.

5. Volunteer at a homeless shelter, food bank or pantry. Organizations like these provide relief to individuals and families struggling to put meals on the table. These organizations rely on volunteers to help them provide food to the community. There are opportunities for individuals and groups. You could give an hour or two once a week, or plan an afternoon service activity for a group. Find an organization in your area and search their website to find ways you can help.

6. Help with a Cooking Matters class. This program, organized by Share Our Strength teaches individuals and families how to prepare healthy meals on a budget. There are opportunities for cooking and nutrition instructors, and also for those willing to grocery shop and manage classrooms. Visit Cooking Matters to learn more and find classes in your area.

7. Volunteer with an urban (or rural) gardening organization. These organizations partner with various organizations in the community to plant gardens to strengthen the local food system, improve access to nutritious food and empower individuals to grow food. Some of these organizations help start gardens in local schools, educating children about healthy eating and providing them with produce to take home to their families.

8. Find volunteer opportunities that match your skills and interests, including tasks that can be completed virtually. Two great sites to start your search are hungervolunter.org and volunteermatch.org. You could translate promotional material into Spanish, help an organization maintain its website or design a flyer for an upcoming event. There are opportunities for many skill sets and ways to get involved without ever leaving your home.

9. Sign up for training to be a Navigator for the Community Partner Program. The Health and Human Services Commission’s Community Partner Program recruits nonprofits, congregations, and other organizations to be sites where food-insecure families can learn what federal  assistance they may be eligible to receive. Volunteers can go through a training session to become a Navigator and walk individuals through the paperwork. Contact one of our regional offices to learn more about the Community Partner Program in your area or visit www. texascommunitypartnerprogram.com.

10. Advocate for a hunger-free community. Become more aware of legislation around hunger and educate others. The Hunger Warriors served as  advocates against childhood hunger. This third-grade class, led by their teacher Rachael Brunson, learned about the issue, created various projects, and ended their semester of service learning by rallying at the Capitol.  If you are a teacher, principal or administrator, service-learning projects can be a great way to advocate for this important issue. Learn best practice tips from this guide, published by Youth Service America and the Sodexo Foundation. Another way to advocate is to take the No Kid Hungry pledge to show your support in the fight against childhood hunger.

11. Donate funds to an organization working to end hunger. It doesn’t have to be a large amount of money—small amounts can make a difference. If your budget is a concern, consider one of these ideas: Request for your birthday that friends and family give to the organization of your choice. Forgo eating out or your daily caffeine fix and donate what you would normally spend. Or choose to donate a small amount each month for a year.

12. Share your story. Have you experienced hunger at some point in your life? Personal stories are a powerful way to show the affects of hunger, and they also can help inspire action. We are actively searching for stories and would love to talk with you. You can also write a guest blog post, and we can work with you through the editing process. Contact us at txhungerinitiative@gmail.com for more information.

13. Connect with anti-hunger organizations through social media. Social media can be a great way to stay informed about the issue and learn about ways to get involved, and discover conferences, webinars and other trainings. Find out about easy ways you can show support, like Dine Out for No Kid Hungry, where a portion of sales at certain restaurants go toward fighting childhood hunger. You can also interact with organizations on social media by liking, commenting and sharing. It can go a long way in spreading the word. Some good organizations to follow include: No Kid Hungry, Feeding America, the Food Research and Action Center, and Bread for the World.

14. Serve a year-long or summer term as an AmeriCorps VISTA.  If you really want to immerse yourself in the fight against food insecurity, AmeriCorps VISTA positions may be a perfect fit for you. You’ll be doing valuable work  for an organization while gaining useful skills. You will earn a monthly stipend, and are eligible to receive an education award (for loans/college tuition) or a cash stipend at the end of your term. We offer VISTA positions each year. Check out our website to learn more about year-long and summer VISTA positions.

This list is by no means exhaustive, but we hope it inspires you to think of ways you can get involved and make 2014 your first year of service on behalf of the hungry in our nation. May we all work toward living a life of service.

Post by: Ashley Yeaman, Social Media & Communications Coordinator, The Texas Hunger Initiative